Tag Archives: Coaching

Oh Canada! Happy to Help Launch the New Brunswick Community College Management Academy

NBCCSIGNA few months ago, I was contacted by the HR department of the New Brunswick Community College in Canada.  The college was developing a curriculum for its planned Management Academy and had selected "Work Happy: What Great Bosses Know" as its primary text. The kickoff was to take place in October, and I was invited to lead the workshop in person.

 

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How could I resist an invitation like that? When I wrote the book, it had always been my hope that organizations would use it just this way. I was more than happy to help NBCC develop and facilitate the learning.

 

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We met on October 23rd and 24th in St. John. It was rainy and gray outside but warm and positive inside the conference center. I worked with the group on leadership fundamentals, coaching, feedback and tough conversations. Nearly 100 managers attended, and they jumped into the conversations and exercises with enthusiasm. It was clear to me that they care deeply about leadership.

 

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This is group shot with Colleen, Nina and Suzanne - -the HR brain trust behind the Academy. NBCCTeam

 

And this is the president of the NBCC, after the group surprised me with a gift: a framed picture of the cover of my book and the logo of the NBCC Management Academy! Jill&MarilynNBCC

 

This wasn't just a two-day program. It's the start of a long-term commitment to the managers of NBCC for continuous learning, providing practical management and leadership tools.

 

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Listen Better and You’ll Communicate Better

I learn something whenever I teach leadership workshops. That's because I believe there's already abundant wisdom already in the room. It was certainly the case when I led a week-long leadership and coaching program for journalists from around the world. As you can see from the class picture, it was a smart, diverse, fun group.     MediaProject2014Class   One of the participants, E.S. Isaac of India, made an impression on everyone. His wisdom and warm smile lifted us all. Isaac has a deep belief in the power of listening.   Jill&Isaac   Isaac inherited that belief from his father, a man who had no formal education, who was illiterate for much of his life, and yet was a formidable teacher. He gently schooled Isaac on the priceless value of listening. Now, your parents and mine may have tried to tell us to listen, but I bet the message was not quite as magical as this. Listen for yourself as Isaac tells the story:     You can read more about Isaac and see a photo of his family in a column I wrote for Poynter.org. Just click here.    
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A Chat across the Pond

ILMlogoMy book, columns and podcasts have connected me with leaders all across the world. Most recently, I was contacted by Rhian Morgan, writing for the Institute for Leadership and Management in the United Kingdom.

 

Rhian sent me a great list of questions, dug back into some of my columns, and wrote this combination profile/interview for ILM. It's called: "Women in Leadership: A Culture of Coaching." We discussed women's skills and values as leaders, the importance of coaching, and the essentials of power and influence. Here's a link to the story.

 

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Manager, Are You Addicted to “Fixing”?

CoachPoster One of the most vexing issues managers face is how to keep quality high. It's key to their job. It's so important that many supervisors make a big mistake: they devote large amounts of their time to fixing the work of their employees. When something needs to be better, they roll up their sleeves and re-do the work.

 

They are "fixers."

 

I know all about fixers. I was a hard core fixer myself, until I learned how damaging it was to my team and to me. That's why one of the most valuable -- and appreciated -- things I teach in my workshops is how to be a coach instead of a fixer. Believe me, if I could learn it, so can you.

 

Why managers fix, and what to do about it, is the subject of my latest column on Poynter.org. Just click on this link to read: "5 Reasons Managers are Addicted to Fixing -- and How to Recover."

 

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Are You a Coach or a Fixer?

CoachPosterIt's a manager's responsibility to keep the quality of products and services high.  One of the biggest mistakes managers make is to do it by "fixing" the work of others.  They jump in and change things, or even do the work themselves.  They do it because it's a quick solution.

 

Here's the problem, though.  "Fixing" is a temporary solution to an ongoing issue.  Your employee or staff isn't really learning when you "fix."  If anything, they are learning to rely on you to upgrade things to your satisfaction, while not growing in their skills.

 

That is why it's so important to "coach" instead of "fix."

 

When you coach people, you teach them the skills they need to improve.  You analyze the work that needs to be done.  You break it down into its key parts.  You even name those parts and describe what quality looks like and how it's achieved.

 

It takes a little time to coach people, but it's well worth the effort, because it's a long-term solution rather than a band-aid.

 

Want to learn more about coaching? Here's a link to one my Poynter columns with plenty of tips. ChristmasCover And in case you're thinking of a good holiday gift for a fixer who wants to become a coach, I devote a whole chapter to coaching in "Work Happy: What Great Bosses Know."

 

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