Archive | March, 2012

The “Bookplate” Solution

THE CHALLENGE: People have been asking me about how to get autographed copies of "WORK HAPPY: WHAT GREAT BOSSES KNOW" after its June 5th publication.  I love signed books myself,  and I really want to sign books for folks, wherever they are and wherever they may have purchased the book.  But -- shipping books back and forth seemed to be a pretty cumbersome endeavor.  I was determined to come up with a practical way to do this.  And then I thought of it... THE SOLUTION:  I came up with an idea I hope will work well for anyone who has purchased a book, no matter where they might be: Customized bookplates. "Bookplate" is really just a fancy name for a sticker -- something that's applied to the inside cover to identify the book's owner. I've had custom bookplates made for "WORK HAPPY: WHAT GREAT BOSSES KNOW." If readers would like to have their book signed, all they have to do is send me an email request.  I will sign and send a bookplate via good old snail mail.

The bookplate instructions are simple:

  • Address your request to jgeisler@poynter.org
  • Put "Bookplate Request" in the subject line
  • Tell me the name of the person(s) for whom I'll be signing a bookplate
  • Include any other info you might want me to include in the signature (i.e., "Congratulations on your promotion" or "To an already great boss!")
  • Include your mailing address
  • Be patient, please, since I'm often on the road teaching -- but I'll respond as quickly as I can!
Thanks! Jill
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The Importance of Editors

Had a great meeting in NYC today at the offices of the Hachette Book Group, planning for the release of  "WORK HAPPY: WHAT GREAT BOSSES KNOW" on June 5th.  At my side in this photo, as she has been throughout the writing of the book, is Hachette editor Kate Hartson. Being an editor takes many of the leadership skills I write about in my book.  A good editor understands motivation, coaching, feedback, time management, and collaboration.  A good editor helps a writer discover ideas and take risks.  A good editor identifies gaps in content or logic, so the writer can fill in the holes.  A good editor encourages and challenges. Interestingly, many editors are accomplished wordsmiths, but they take great care not to pressure writers into emulating their personal writing style.  Their goal is simple: to guide the author toward success while keeping the author's unique voice intact.  That's leadership. I've been blessed to have that great leadership from Julie Moos.  She's the head of Poynter.org, the website for which I produce "What Great Bosses Know" columns and podcasts.  Her encouragement and skillful editing helped lead to the development of Work Happy: What Great Bosses Know.  In fact, she's been at the head of a line of incredible cheerleaders for the book.  But Julie's done more than cheer.  She's edited columns and podcasts, brainstormed ideas for the book and helped with the book proposal.  She even helped me set up this web site, which I could not have done without her. Great bosses -- including great editors -- often stay in the background while good things are happening for those they lead.  That's why it's important to turn the spotlight on them -- and offer them my heartfelt thanks.      
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Ten Antidotes to Staff Burnout

It's a fact of management life in a challenging economy: people are being asked to do more with less.  In times of change, we are also asking staff and managers alike to learn and do new things.  Technology can keep us feeling like we are on call, 24/7, because people can so easily reach us wherever we are. As a result, there's a real concern about burnout.  We don't want employees working in a constant environment of exhaustion, frustration or fear.  But I'm hearing more and more about those situations these days.  That's why I wrote my most recent column for Poynter.org, "Ten Tips for Preventing Staff Burnout." If you click on this link, it will take you directly to the the column, with ten tips, as well as a podcast with a bonus tip as well.
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What They’re Saying about “WORK HAPPY: WHAT GREAT BOSSES KNOW”: Bob Schieffer, CBS News

"I’ve seen Jill Geisler in action. She has an uncanny ability to unravel the most complicated workplace problems and come up with creative solutions to resolve them. Combine those insights with the fact that she is also a cracker jack writer and the result is a book that will come in handy whether you’re running a newsroom or a construction site – I know because I’ve worked in both." — Bob Schieffer, CBS News Chief Washington Correspondent
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First Russia – Now Brazil!

The publisher of "WORK HAPPY: WHAT GREAT BOSSES KNOW" has just sent me even more good news!  On the heels of negotiating the rights for a Russian translation of the book, Hachette now informs me that another agreement will lead to Portuguese language edition for readers in Brazil! I think it's a reminder that leadership is a universal language -- and becoming a great boss is a true quest.  But tough as it is, it's a challenge for which too few people get good training. I'm delighted to help change that. It's a joy to know that managers, employees, workplaces -- and my employer, the Poynter Institute, will all benefit from the worldwide distribution of "WORK HAPPY: WHAT GREAT BOSSES KNOW."
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